Connective Tissue Disease and Vaccine Injury

Connective Tissue Disease and Vaccine Injury

Connective tissue diseases can result in serious complications and often be debilitating. These conditions are considered autoimmune diseases. Sadaka Law has been successful in linking connective tissue disease to certain vaccines.

What is a connective tissue disease?

Connective tissue disease affects the structural portions of our body that essentially hold the cells of the body together a/k/a connective tissue. These tissues form a framework, or matrix, for the body. In patients with connective tissue diseases, it is common for the connective tissue to become injured by inflammation, which can result in a wide range of symptoms, depending on the location and severity of the injury.

Many connective tissue diseases feature abnormal immune system activity with inflammation in tissues as a result of the body’s immune system attacking its tissues. This is called an autoimmune disease.

What are some common connective tissue diseases?

There are many different connective tissue diseases, but some of the more common ones include dermatomyositis, lupus, rheumatoid arthritis, scleroderma, and Sjogren’s.

Dermatomyositis

Dermatomyositis is a connective tissue disorder that results in the inflammation of the muscles and skin. It is believed to be an autoimmune disorder. Treatment for dermatomyositis typically involves a combination of immunosuppressive drugs and physical therapy.

Dermatomyositis most commonly affects children and young adults, though it can occur at any age. Women are affected more often than men. The disorder is characterized by muscle weakness and a distinctive rash. The rash is usually red or purple and appears on the face, neck, chest, and/or upper arms. It may also affect other parts of the body such as the scalp, trunk, and legs.

Muscle weakness usually occurs on both sides of the body to the muscles closest to the body. The weakened muscles may cause difficulties with activities of daily living such as combing one’s hair, lifting objects, or climbing stairs. In severe cases, the muscle weakness can progress to involve the respiratory muscles, which can lead to respiratory failure.

Lupus

Lupus is a chronic, autoimmune disease that can damage any part of the body, including the skin, joints, kidneys, brain, heart, lungs, and blood vessels. Lupus is characterized by periods of flares (when symptoms worsen) and remission (when symptoms improve). Lupus often results in organ damage, especially to the kidneys.

There is no known cure for lupus, but treatments can help to manage the symptoms and reduce the severity and duration of flares. Treatment typically involves a combination of immunosuppressive drugs and physical therapy.

Mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD)

Mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) is an autoimmune disorder that affects multiple systems of the body. It is characterized by periods of flares (when symptoms worsen) and remission (when symptoms improve). The exact cause of MCTD is unknown, but it is believed to be an autoimmune disorder. Treatment for MCTD typically involves a combination of immunosuppressive drugs and physical therapy.

MCTD most commonly affects adults between the ages of 20-50, though it can occur at any age. Women are affected more often than men. The disorder is characterized by a distinctive rash, Raynaud’s phenomenon, joint pain and swelling, muscle weakness, and/or kidney problems. In severe cases, it can lead to disability.

Rheumatoid arthritis

Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic, autoimmune disease that affects the joints. It is characterized by periods of flares (when symptoms worsen) and remission (when symptoms improve). The exact cause of rheumatoid arthritis is unknown, but it is believed to be an autoimmune disorder. Treatment for rheumatoid arthritis typically involves a combination of immunosuppressive drugs and physical therapy.

Rheumatoid arthritis most commonly affects adults over the age of 40, though it can occur at any age. Women are affected more often than men. The disorder is characterized by joint pain, stiffness, swelling, and deformity. In severe cases, it can lead to disability.

Scleroderma

Scleroderma is a chronic, autoimmune disease that affects the connective tissue. It is characterized by periods of flares (when symptoms worsen) and remission (when symptoms improve). The exact cause of scleroderma is unknown, but it is believed to be an autoimmune disorder. Treatment for scleroderma typically involves a combination of immunosuppressive drugs and physical therapy.

Scleroderma most commonly affects adults over the age of 40, though it can occur at any age. Women are affected more often than men. The disorder is characterized by hardening and thickening of the skin, which can lead to joint pain, stiffness, and deformity. In severe cases, it can lead to disability.

Sjogren’s Syndrome

Sjögren’s syndrome is a chronic, autoimmune disease that affects the exocrine glands. It is characterized by periods of flares (when symptoms worsen) and remission (when symptoms improve). The exact cause of Sjögren’s syndrome is unknown, but it is believed to be an autoimmune disorder. Treatment for Sjögren’s syndrome typically involves a combination of immunosuppressive drugs and physical therapy.

What are the symptoms of connective tissue diseases?

The symptoms of connective tissue diseases can vary widely, depending on the specific disease. In general, however, patients may experience fatigue, joint pain, muscle pain, skin rashes, or other skin problems. Some patients may also have difficulty breathing or swallowing.

How are connective tissue diseases diagnosed?

The diagnosis of a connective tissue disease is often made based on the patient’s symptoms and a physical examination. In some cases, blood tests or other diagnostic tests may be ordered to confirm the diagnosis.

What is the treatment for connective tissue diseases?

The treatment of connective tissue diseases varies depending on the specific disease. In general, however, treatment may include medications to reduce inflammation, pain relief medication, and physical therapy. Some patients may also require surgery to correct any damage that has occurred to the connective tissues.

Do vaccines cause connective tissue diseases?

There is some evidence that certain vaccines can trigger polymyositis and dermatomyositis. For example, Sadaka Law was successful in obtaining compensation for a young boy who developed dermatomyositis as a result of the MMR vaccine, a live-virus vaccine. There is some evidence that certain vaccines can make Lupus worse. For example, Sadaka law was successful in obtaining compensation for a young woman who had lupus that was worsened by Gardasil.

The Vaccine Injury Compensation Program is the only place to seek compensation for vaccine-related injuries in the United States. If you or a loved one has suffered a vaccine injury, please contact us today for a free consultation.

What are the long-term effects of connective tissue diseases?

The long-term effects of connective tissue diseases can vary depending on the specific disease. In general, however, patients may experience joint damage, muscle weakness, and disability. Some patients may also be at risk for other autoimmune diseases or cancer.

What vaccines cause connective tissue disease?

Sadaka Law has successfully recovered compensation for people suffering from vaccine-caused connective tissue disease.

  • $180,690.00 recovery which includes life care expenses for an active 13-year-old girl from Georgia who developed Systemic Lupus Erythematosus or SLE and subsequent sequelae because of receiving Gardasil.
  • $3,210,000.00 + recovery for a 4-year-old boy from Georgia who developed dermatomyositis as a result of the MMR vaccine.

A vaccine injury can be devastating to the victim and their family. You need to hire an experienced vaccine injury lawyer like Sadaka Law to handle this type of complex case.

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